More Pet Safety Tips

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June 12, 2009
Comments (3)

While we are on the subject of Pet Safety, I thought I would add more tips for keeping your pet out of harms way.

Cats and dogs tend to explore things with their mouths. Therefore as pet owners, we need to ensure that what they are putting in their mouths is safe. Many common household items can be dangerous and even lethal to our pets.

Below are 10 Tips for Preventing Poisoning, by Dr. Jill A. Richardson, DVM of the NAPCC

1. Be aware of the plants you have in your house and in your pet’s yard. The ingestion of azalea, oleander, mistletoe, sago palm, Easter lily, or yew plant material, by an animal, could be fatal. (see lists of toxic plants and website references below).

poisonous-household-items2. When cleaning your house, never allow your pet access to the area where cleaning agents are used or stored. Cleaning agents have a variety of properties. Some may only cause a mild stomach upset, while others could cause severe burns of the tongue, mouth, and stomach.

3. When using rat or mouse baits, ant or roach traps, or snail and slug baits, place the products in areas that are inaccessible to your animals. Most baits contain sweet smelling inert ingredients, such as jelly, peanut butter, and sugars, which can be very attractive to your pet.

4. Never give your animal any medications unless under the direction of your veterinarian. Many medications that are used safely in humans can be deadly when used inappropriately. One extra strength acetaminophen tablet (500mg) can kill a seven-pound cat.

rx5. Keep all prescription and over the counter drugs out of your pets’ reach, preferably in closed cabinets. Pain killers, cold medicines, anti-cancer drugs, antidepressants, vitamins, and diet pills are common examples of human medication that could be potentially lethal even in small dosages. One regular strength ibuprofen (200mg) could cause stomach ulcers in a ten-pound dog.

6. Never leave chocolates unattended. Approximately one-half ounce or less of baking chocolate per pound body weight can cause problems. Even small amounts can cause pancreatic problems.

7. Many common household items have been shown to be lethal in certain species. Miscellaneous items that are highly toxic even in low quantities include pennies (high concentration of zinc), mothballs (contain naphthalene or paradichlorobenzene. One or two balls can be life threatening in most species), potpourri oils, fabric softener sheets, automatic dish washing detergents (contain cationic detergents which could cause corrosive lesions), batteries (contain acids or alkali which can also cause corrosive lesions), homemade play dough (contains high quantity of salt), winter heat source agents like hand or foot warmers (contain high levels of iron), cigarettes, coffee grounds, and alcoholic drinks.

garage-poisons8. All automotive products such as oil, gasoline, and antifreeze, should be stored in areas away from pet access. As little as one teaspoon of antifreeze (ethylene glycol) can be deadly in a seven-pound cat and less than one tablespoon could be lethal to a 20-pound dog.

9. Before buying or using flea products on your pet or in your household, contact your veterinarian to discuss what types of flea products are recommended for your pet. Read ALL information before using a product on your animals or in your home. Always follow label instructions. When a product is labeled “for use in dogs only” this means that the product should NEVER be applied to cats. Also, when using a fogger or a house spray, make sure to remove all pets from the area for the time period specified on the container. If you are uncertain about the usage of any product, contact the manufacturer or your veterinarian to clarify the directions BEFORE use of the product.

800-number10. When treating your lawn or garden with fertilizers, herbicides, or insecticides, always keep your animals away from the area until the area dries completely. Discuss usage of products with the manufacturer of the products to be used. Always store such products in an area that will ensure no possible pet exposure.

Make sure you always have the number available for your local Poison Control Center  as well as Pet Emergency Clinic numbers in case your pet ingests something and you need help fast.

Comments

3 Responses to “More Pet Safety Tips”

  1. Before you make plans to travel with your pet, follow these suggestions:

    If you plan to bring your pet on vacation, consider driving instead of flying. (Neither Amtrak nor Greyhound allows pets.) If this isn’t possible, consider leaving your pet behind under the care of a pet sitter or boarding kennel.

    If you are relocating across the country, consider using a company whose primary business is to transport animals.

    Remember, any inconvenience you might experience while researching and looking for safe travel options for your pet is minor when weighed against the risk of losing your companion forever. Above all, when making travel decisions, please consider what is best for your pet.

  2. Joy says:

    thank you so much for raising awarness. My roomate and I are considering getting some cats and while I love the vibrancy these plants give, I’d rather have a happy pet. ..are carnivorous plants bad for them too?

  3. Dodie says:

    I don’t believe you mentioned raisins or grapes, both highly toxic to dogs.

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